NEWS

“N” World Premiere. Reviews below.

A young, white actor is a caregiver for a passionate, social and political conservative African American woman.  When he refuses to use the N-Word in a play he performing, they each learn something from the other’s perspective

 “Doublin, Hemphill, and Smetana all did incredible jobs portraying their characters as real, flawed people, with deeply held beliefs that they finally realize may not be as deeply held. So go see it, unless of course you’re worried you’ll leave having learned something about yourself you would rather have not.” Third Coast Review -James Brod

“If you need a reason other than seeing an incredibly relevant and powerful production, I’ll leave you with: I am a privileged white woman, and I most certainly did not pick up on all of the subtleties and deeper meanings. This is not for any lack of skill on the part of the production, but simply because I do not have the life experience that will lead me to fully comprehend all of the emotional depth of the piece or express the entire importance of this production through my own words. So, please see it and tell me what I missed and what I misinterpreted.” Chicago Theatre Review -Sophia Vitello

“A provocative world premiere by Chicago writer David Alex at the Greenhouse Theater Center, this 100-minute character piece stirs up the sometimes static tale of an evolving relationship between proverbial and political opposites. As they learn from each other, the audience gets the best of both worlds. . . Can a trigger word for hate ever be spoken on stage, especially by a white actor? Does tame talk ever touch the truth? These are questions around which Alex constructs a solid story. . .Director TaRon Patton keeps it real, with help from three actors who prove very present and accounted for.” Stage and Screen -Larry Bommer

“Racism is America’s embarrassment. With his latest masterpiece, N, performed at the Greenhouse Theatre with GLP Productions, directed by TaRon Patton, he creates the much needed dialogue that works to join people at the soul, as they realize that their humanity is as necessary as oxygen and transcends any color, emotional issues, past history or preconceived notions.  N proves that the need for human relationship goes beyond our social contrivances and comes from a deeper well that we have no control over.” Theater World -Ruth Smerling


“How these issues all unwind is the crux of the relationship between the characters, as well as the trajectory of the play. Indeed, that focus creates for a riveting production, and heartfelt performances by Doublin and Smetana add to the compelling nature of the work.” LeBon Travel and Culture -Betty Mohr

We really see the characters come into their own. Stacie Doublin is powerful in the later dialog. And a final, doleful scene performed in silence by Eddy and Mrs. Page is moving and strongly affecting. Also noteworthy is the performance of Reginald Hemphill as Eddy’s buddy DeShawn, who commands the stage for his brief time on it. Speaking also on word usage, “You are not a ‘brother,’” DeShawn, who is African-American, advises Eddy. “This may come as a shock to your white liberal sensibilities, but you are not black!” Buzz Center Stage -Bill Esler